Tag Archives: Hafiz Karim

NHL is not taking the threat of concussions seriously enough

November 12, 2013

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By Hafiz Karim – Thompson Rivers University 2L JD Student

Concussions have become a prominent issue in the world of hockey and they are becoming more and more noticeable in the National Hockey League.Through the first month of this season, the rate of concussions in the NHL is up by about 30%.Just this season alone, we’ve seen star players such as Rick Nash, Dustin Penner, Danny Briere and Dan Boyle all suffer concussions.

There is no doubt that concussions are an extremely serious issue and the NHL Player Safety department has tried to address this.Rule 48.1 of the Official NHL Rulebook defines illegal checks to the head.It states that, “a hit resulting in contact with an opponent’s head where the head is targeted and the principal point of contact is not permitted.”The NHL states that they take this issue seriously and in reality they generally hand out suspensions for illegal checks to the head.Whether the sanctions given out to players who deliver headshots is adequate or even working is a question for another day.

The NHL makes a point of denouncing checks to the head but are they doing enough?One of my biggest problems with the NHL’s denunciation of headshots is that it is largely reactive rather than proactive.What I mean by that is that the NHL will suspend a player if he makes a deliberate and dangerous hit if a player gets injured, but they rarely seem to do anything over an attempted dangerous hit.

An example of this occurred last week in a game on November 2nd between the Vancouver Canucks and the Toronto Maple Leafs.Henrik Sedin, star centre of the Vancouver Canucks, cut to the front of the net and as he did so, Joffrey Lupul of the Maple Leafs, stuck out his elbow and took a run at Sedin.Sedin later said that he saw the elbow coming for his head out of the corner of his eye and was able to duck out of the way at the last minute.Lupul came at such speed that when he missed Sedin’s head, his momentum carried him forward and he ended up hitting his teammate Nazem Kadri in the head with his elbow.The game was being broadcasted by CBC as part of their Hockey Night in Canada program and it was astounding that the commentators did not reference this attempted dirty hit nor was there a replay shown of it during the game.It may have gone entirely unnoticed if not for social media, which picked up on it and the video clip went viral following the game.

The first time I watched the video, I thought it was hilarious that Lupul ended up elbowing his own teammate in the head.Only later did I realize how bad that could have been if Lupul’s cheap shot had actually connected with Sedin’s head when he was in a vulnerable position.Henrik Sedin is one of the star players on the Vancouver Canucks and is currently tied for third in points in the NHL this season.He also is second in the active Ironman streak in the league that recognizes most consecutive games played.That could have all ended had Lupul’s elbow connected.The Canucks were dominating the Leafs and Lupul must have been frustrated or angry because there is no doubt that he deliberately tried injuring Henrik Sedin with an elbow to the head.It amazes me that the league lays sanctions on players if they injure their opponent, but that there are no sanctions for deliberate attempts to injure that do not work.Even if the referees on the ice did not see Lupul’s attempt to injure another player, there is no way that the NHL did not see that play later on as it went viral.  How do you send a message that illegal checks to the head are not OK and are a suspendable offence, but attempting a check to the head is not a big deal as long it doesn’t connect?

In today’s day and age when there is so much evidence of the detriment of brain injuries, it makes zero sense not to punish players for attempting illegal shots to the head.As a Vancouver Province blogger stated, it makes no sense that someone would have to potentially concuss another player before they get suspended, yet they can attempt it as many times as they want without risk, until they connect.  

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To fight or not to fight that is the question

October 30, 2013

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By Hafiz Karim – Thompson Rivers University 2L JD Student

Fighting in hockey: it has always been a contentious issue, but will it be taken out of the National Hockey League in the near future?  

Rule 46 of the Official NHL Rulebook governs fighting in the NHL.It sets out the criteria for what constitutes a fight, what the rules of a fight are, fines as well as everything else related to an NHL fight.Fighting has always been a part of the game and many are emphatic that fighting needs to remain in the game or the sport of hockey will not be the same.Most teams in the NHL have at least one player who acts as the designated tough guy or goon, and if fighting were no longer in the game, most of them would be out of a job.It is understandable that this group of players does not want fighting to be taken out of the game.Perhaps surprisingly, it is not only this small group of players who want fighting to remain in the game.In a recent article, Kevin Bieksa of the Vancouver Canucks stated that “we’ll play with a tennis ball before we take fighting out” when asked about whether fighting should be removed from the NHL.Players around the league echoed Bieksa’s comment. 

For the most part, fans of the game of hockey love the fights that often occur.This is evidenced in the fact that the crowd at any arena in the NHL erupts and goes wild whenever there is a fight.Based on the reactions of the spectators, it seems that most of them get more excited about a fight than a goal.  This tells you a lot about how fans of the game view fighting in the NHL. 

Another popular view of why many players and fans believe that fighting should remain in the game is expressed by Vancouver Canucks’ enforcer Tom Sestito.Sestito states, “if you don’t have fighting in the game, there are going to be a lot of dirty hits.”He is referencing the idea of accountability on the ice and he believes that fighting holds players accountable.The idea is that without the threat of being challenged to a fight, there is no accountability and that injuries will actually increase because there will be more dirty hits.

Between player and fan support of fighting in the NHL, it seemed like it was going to stay.However, due to an event earlier this month, the debate of whether to remove fighting or not reopened.On the night of October 1st, in a game between the Toronto Maple Leafs and Montreal Canadiens, Colton Orr and George Parros, the respective enforcers for their teams squared off.The two started throwing punches, which led to Orr losing his balance and falling down.Orr still had a hold of Parros’ jersey as he fell and as Parros threw a punch, he too lost balance and fell face first into the ice.Parros was knocked unconscious, suffered a concussion and had to be taken off the ice in a stretcher. 

This event caused four NHL general managers to come out and speak publicly against fighting in the NHL.Tampa Bay’s Steve Yzerman, Carolina’s Jim Rutherford, Pittsburgh’s Ray Shero and St. Louis’ Doug Armstrong all publicly said it was time that the league took a tougher stance on fighting.  This was significant because in the past the argument was that it was only the media who spoke out against fighting but the “real” hockey people recognized the value of fighting.That argument was laid to rest with the statements made by these general managers.Rutherford was very blunt and stated, “we’ve got to get rid of fighting.It has to go.” Yzerman made a strong argument by pointing out the efforts the league goes through to reduce head injuries by penalizing and suspending players for making contact with the head but they still allow fighting.He goes on to say that “we’re stuck in the middle and need to decide what kind of sport do we want to be.Either anything goes, and we accept the consequences, or take the next step and eliminate fighting.”

Will the NHL re-examine their policy on fighting in the league after the Parros injury and the public statements made by four of their general managers or will they continue to allow fighting in the league?Only time will tell.

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