The Future of Video Review in the NHL

December 2, 2013

Uncategorized

By Chelsea Dubeau – Thompson Rivers University 2L JD Student

In a recent hockey game between the Vancouver Canucks and the Dallas Stars, Henrik Sedin scored what would have been a game-tying goal. The referee waived off the goal, citing “incidental” goaltender interference by Daniel Sedin in the crease. Television replays quickly revealed that there was no contact between the players. The disallowed goal proved to be the difference in the game, as the Stars held on to win by a score of 2-1.

In his post-game interviews, Canucks coach John Tortorella expressed his discontent with the referees not reviewing the judge. The Dallas goalie, Kari Lehtonen, also agreed with this sentiment, stating, “I wish they would maybe use some video replay or something just to make them right.”

Video review is currently only available in a game in situations of a disputed goal or to verify time. Rule 38.1(ii) of the Official Rules states that video review can be utilized when the goal judge is “requested to do so by the Referees.”

The National Hockey League is one of many leagues that utilize instant replay for decision-making, in addition to the on-field officials. However, the NHL is often criticized for the restrictions on the use of this technology.

Two possible ways in which the NHL could expand video replay is through allowing review of more than just scoring plays, or introducing the ability to challenge a call.

The National Basketball Association allows video review for situations such as the correct scoring of a shot, determining if a player has stayed within bounds, determining penalties during player altercations, and whether to call a flagrant foul. Review is still conducted at the discretion of the on-field official, and the final decision remains with the Crew Chief.

Major League Baseball has a similar system to the NHL, in which the Chief Umpire makes the executive decision whether to review a play. However, a player or coach may argue for a play to be reviewed. The MLB rules also do not restrict video review to scoring plays. It can also be utilized to determine whether a ball has left the playing field, or if there was interference from a spectator.

The NHL could introduce a similar expanded system of when a referee can review a play. There could be the ability to review whether icing applied or whether the faceoff should remain in the offensive zone. There could be the ability to review penalties that assessed during more serious situations, such as in overtime of playoff games. The referee could review which team last handled the puck before it went out of play, leading to a possible delay of game penalty.

The rules could simply be expanded to review any plays related to scoring, not just the actual goal itself. The ability to review on-ice calls could eliminate erroneous calls of goaltender interference, such as the incident that occurred with Daniel Sedin. It could also be applicable to an official that misses stopping play due to an offside player, which then leads to a scoring chance and eventual goal.

The other option available to the NHL is to consider the ability to challenge a play.

While MLB is looking to introduce a manager’s challenge during the 2014 season, there are many other leagues that are currently utilizing this rule.

Some tennis bodies, including the Grand Slam Committee, allow players to make up to three challenges during a set.

In the National Football League, coaches are allowed to challenge an official’s decision, at least twice per game. However, they are not allowed to challenge subjective calls, such as most penalties. Challenges for too many men and illegal passes are allowed.

The NHL would have to consider many questions in regards to the introduction of a challenge. Could individual players challenge, such as in tennis? Would the team captain be able to propose review? Or would the discretion remain with the on-ice official, such as in the NBA?

If challenges were introduced, what would be limitations on the timing or amount?  Would it be restricted to each period, or each game? Would it depend on the extent of the game played, and reset later in the game, such as in the MLB? What types of calls could be challenged? Would it still be restricted to scoring? Would penalties be off limits due to their nature as judgement calls, similar to the NFL? How would the video review be conducted? Would everything still be sent to the ‘war room’ in Toronto, or could the on-ice officials review calls themselves, similar to the NBA? How would the challenge rules change if the game is in overtime, or if it was during the playoffs?

These are only a few of many questions that would need to be considered before a new system could be implemented.

Last year, sporting news outlets were reporting that topic of discussion at a General Manager’s meeting was the possibility of a coach’s challenge. While no rule changes occurred this season, as other sports move towards the integration more video replay, the NHL may be more inclined to follow suit.

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