Police investigate lacrosse head stomping incident

June 30, 2011

Uncategorized

I live in the same city in which the court two years ago acquitted of assault a high-school player whose punch broke an opponent rugby player’s nose and cheekbone and has just had another violent incident in which during a lacrosse game it is alleged a 15 year old boy was head stomped by an opponent (click here for the article in The Vancouver Sun).

But first, in R v. TNB (BCPC 0117), Honourable Judge S.D. Frame ruled that players consent to violent contact within and certain violent conduct outwith the rules of the game. Cognizant of the playing culture of the game, Frame J. stated that the ‘amalgam of rules includes the legitimate strategy of intimidation of the opposite team by head-butting, eye gouging, elbowing, raking and punching’ and noted that ‘none of these infractions is permitted by the written rules but it is accepted by the unwritten code of conduct at this level of play in the game of rugby.’ The defendant was exonerated on the grounds that the punch was randomly thrown and not intended to target and hit the injured plaintiff and, as such, fit within rugby’s unwritten but accepted code of conduct.

Now the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) are investigating the incident in which Blake Rose was felled by two cross-checks (which if properly administered are permissible) but then had his head stomped on in the waning minutes of a lacrosse game between the Kamloops Rattlers and Kelowna Kodiaks. The league has suspended the offending player. RCMP spokesman Staff Sgt. Grant Learned correctly noted that the investigation will hinge on whether ‘the nature of that contact [the cross-check and stomp] was so outside the boundaries of acceptable contact that the nature of misconduct was egregious and bordering into that realm of criminality?”

With respect to J. Frame’s judgment in R v. TNB, if the head stomping allegations are proven true, it is hoped that the court will not take such an accommodating view of the role of violence in sport and the extent to which participants consent to injurious force which are prohibited by the rules but are incredulously permitted within the culture of the game.

Advertisements
, , , , , , ,

Follow us:

Subscribe to our RSS feed and social profiles to receive updates.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: