Tort Law’s Inapplicability to Extreme Sports: The Death of Canadian Ski Cross Racer Nik Zoricic

November 12, 2013

Uncategorized

By Kelsey Petersen – Thompson Rivers University 2L JD Student

The National Post, in their coverage of the death of Canadian Ski Cross racer Nik Zoricic, quoted head coach, Eric Archer, as saying “the athletes are all searching for the same elusive thing: the edge of possibility.All truly elite athletes are searching for that line – they are trying to push the boundary of what humans can do.” In many extreme sports, pushing the boundaries leads to a form of risk taking that the law of negligence has yet to appreciate.Plaintiffs who are hurt while engaging in high risk activities do not fit within a doctrine that uses reasonableness as its central criterion.

Referred to NASCAR on skis, ski cross features up to six athletes racing side by side over banked corners and jumps 140 feet in length.Ski Cross began, and gained its popularity in the X-Games, and has been modified only slightly to become a World Cup and Olympic event.While the World Cup circuit features only four competitors racing at a time, as compared to six at a time in X-Games competition, the extreme nature of competition has transcended into the alpine racing circuit yet is not subject to the same regulations that traditional alpine disciplines enjoy.

Tim Danson, attorney for the Zoricic family, has called the death of Nik Zoricic the result of “gross negligence of race organizers and officials.”Although the Swiss police report found there to have been no third party causation involved in the crash, Danson is calling for the International Ski Federation (FIS) and Alpine Canada to conduct their own independent investigations to determine whether improper jump trajectory, safety measures and grooming protocols were responsible for Zoricic’s death.

While Smolden v Whitworth held that sport is not a special case with its own discrete jurisprudence, divorced from established general principles, the specific circumstances are of crucial importance in determining the applicability of tort principles.In addition to defining what is reasonable versus unreasonable risk within extreme sports, the court must evaluate the fundamental nature of the sport, and the defendant’s role and relationship to the sport, to determine whether the defendant owes a duty to protect the plaintiff from a particular risk of harm.

Athletes involved in extreme sports are often anything but careful, pushing the boundaries of risk taking to be successful in their sport; yet participating in a dangerous sport does not mean that an athlete consents to negligence which increases the risks posed by the sport itself.The defence of voluntary assumption of risk is yet another area to expose tort law’s inability to apply to extreme sports.“Traditionally, the assumption of risk defence barred a plaintiff’s claim, whether his behaviour was reasonable or unreasonable, on the ground that he voluntarily chose to encounter a known danger.” The assumption of risk doctrine is even more important in extreme sports where, by their nature, they are inherently dangerous.The risk of injury is extremely high without the defendant’s negligence increasing the likelihood of injury.While the voluntary assumption of risk defence continues to apply to dangers inherent in the sport, duty can be imposed if the defendant, through their negligence, increased the inherent risks of the sport. 

R v Jobidon held, in a criminal law context, that one cannot consent to death or grievous bodily harm. Can the principle of negligence follow with the assertion that an athlete cannot consent to death in extreme sports?  The death of Georgian luger Nodar Kumaritashvili prompted the following statement: “No sports mistake is supposed to lead to death.No sports mistake is supposed to be fatal.” While extreme sports adhere to a practice of increased risk, tort law principles must be modified to allow for the increased nature of risk in extreme sports to be preserved while maintaining the athlete’s right to impose liability on those guilty of negligence.

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One Comment on “Tort Law’s Inapplicability to Extreme Sports: The Death of Canadian Ski Cross Racer Nik Zoricic”

  1. Shawnmurphy Says:

    Exactly!!! Right on point. Will be interesting to see how this case is dealt with!

    Reply

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